An army of spiders begins – plus third game overview

This week, I had a go at assembling and starting to paint what is no doubt a horrible gamepiece, but wonderful model – the Goblin Warboss on Gigantic Spider.  This was ordered a fortnight ago with the idea that it would lead my unfinished Arachnarok with about fifty Forest Goblin Spider Riders a core for a fast army alternative to the typical mix of hitty Orcs and Gobbo grenades.  The model was what drew my eye – as is clear from such a ridiculous army list, it isn’t a competitive force but a fun army to design and display.  I like the idea of an all-Goblin army, and even creating the fluff of such a themed force.  It is probably a laughable enterprise, but it’s fun to me! I also went with the garish bright colours of a poisonous spider – as this is one of the creature’s base skills in combat.  I toned it down from my other WIP – Arachnarok, but still went with a lively red finish.

The model was a disaster to assemble.  It is still in metal, and for such a  body weight to rest on essentially two thin leg pieces that are not directly beneath the central core, it is a real challenge to glue together and hold in place.  The assembly was complicated by poor instructions or labelling (i.e. none) and really is a two-person job ideally to glue and then hold while drying  – two legs need to be attached at a time in order to work out the central gravity that will be needed to hold the thing in place!  The very nicely detailed base piece has one place for a single leg to stand, but for anyone thinking of getting this model – be patient and PAINT THE BASE FIRST!  I didn’t, and now will be painting sideways and under the body because when the spider is finally in a position that it can (a) stay together, (b) stand on the base fully and (c) hold the pose you want for it – there is no taking any part off.  As it was, one of the front legs broke in assembly – terribly weak break joint coupled with my own desire to glue it all in one sitting – but with patience and a lot of glue – it holds.

The painting was a dream – primed in Chaos Black – then based the spider in Merchite Red, Washed in a mix of Baal Red and Leviathan Purpler (2:1) and allowed to dry fully. 

I then layered on some Scab Red before a wetbrush of Red Gore.  The Spikes on the carapace I highlighted in Blood Red, along with some edge highlighting on the legs with the same.  The tips of the legs I ran in a drybrush of Chaos Black; followed by a drybrush of Dheneb Stone and Fortress Grey mix (1:1).   I gave a final highlight to the wee spikes with some Blazing Orange, but in hindsight, would rethink a touch darker.

Eyes were first picked out i Orchide Shade, before getting a dab of Scorpion Green and a dot of Skull White.  The tissue between the leg joints I used some Tausept Ochre and washed with a light Ogryn Flesh. The mandibles were Codex Grey with a drybrush of Dhenb Stone.  For the mouth, mostly obscured, I chose a simple Chaos Black.

The seat and Warboss were primed with same Chaod Black, and the Forest Goblin was given a typical (for me) Foresty Goblin bright shading.  I based in Knarloc Green, then layered in Goblin Green with a wetbrush of Snot green and a highlight of thin Scorpion Green on raised points.  The mask and assorted bones were solid Bleached Bone washed in Devlan Mud, while the the clothing got a mix of Dheneb Stone and Snakebite Leather (2:1) – again, heavily washed in Devlan Mud.  The staff was Scorched Brown tipped with a spearhead of Warlock Purple, drybrushed with Codex Grey.

The seat was primarily Bestial Brown, with plenty of Fortress Grey drybrush webbing.  The ends of the cut logs were desert yellow and washed with Badb Black – Devlan would work just as well.  Feathers were painter’s choice – for these dinky guys I go with wild and varied.  I used some old Tentacle Pink and Hawk Turquoise – alog with plenty of variations on yellow and blue to compliment my other themed Spider Riders that I’m still building.

It is still a work in progress, but it is getting there!  I really like it, and it looks pretty good on a board flanked by two fast cav spider riders and running the vanguard of an arachnarok Spider Shrine!

But can it play?  I used it in my third ever game this week, and it had varied results.  This game was against Lizardmen, and a very worthy opponent who was not out to teach me, but to play competitively with a seasoned army.  He was an absolute gent, and I learned a lot from him – I had to admire his patience with me stalling to look at the army book for the zillionth time as he tore me apart methodically!  He easily won the game, and my own boyz just didn’t get into the close combat soon enough before my Boar Chariot, Goblin Spearmen and Spider Riders bought it against sneaky Skinks and Salamanders.  My Warboss fled the battle on the third turn – his MVP Stegadon was running riot on my left flank.  Before he went, the Warboss managed to take down a tower of Skinks, and one wound on the Stegadon, but ultimately not enough to prevent a rattling that saw me run 11″ on the 8″ side of play.  My esteemed oponement easily knocked me for six, and I left feeling pretty low – but also good too.  I had learned about a new enemy – Lizardmen who worked with a practiced general to wear down from afar while rolling through the weaker units to turn the game away from the natural orc tactic.  I also realise I need to horde up mighty quick and paint some more Boyz and Black Orcs to be any real threat in the centre.  I’m still painting some Night Goblins on the side that I want to finish first, but if I want to not stink so badly in real games – there really is only one way to go!

This was my first real game without stabalisers – and I really do love it.  It wouldn’t be unfair or defensive to say I had spectacular poor luck with the dice in the last game – but with no excuses, I was making mistakes and unwise decisions all over the battlefield.  If I saw a single weakness that needs an answer fast, it’d be in the Shooting Stage.  I gots nothing for this.  Whatever about poor rolls, without something in the shooting phase, magic and combat don’t count for much.  If anyone has any idea what an Orc and Goblin army or player might do to improve this – please let me know!  I could use the help!  Anyway – am engaged to a doubles game next week, where at least the odds rise in my favour a little!  It will be my own army, but I’ll have an Empire Player coaching some plays too – so should prove interesting!

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Painty Lazy Susan and my second ever Warhammer game

Ok – this last week I’ve been working on a couple of things – first and foremost, and in honour of the new Citadel paint range, I wanted to future-proof my painting area while tidying it up a nooch.  I’ve long been trying to find a better way to display my paints, which are largely the citadel range, and my trusty ole toolbox had pretty much run its course as a hold all when I discovered the renaming and new paints about to flood the market.  I decided it was time to actually put something worthwhile together, and came to the conclusion that a carousel would be the best way to store and access by type.

To that end, I knocked together this lazy susan idea in MDF.  I’m a teacher, so the woodwork room always has some scrap timber lying about, and this wasn’t a major project, more an idea with little time required to complete in a few lunch breaks.  It was never meant for aesthetic appeal, and really only as an experiment to see if it did work, but I’m happy to report I’m mighty happy with it as of now!  I won’t patronise readers by going through dimensions and specs, as I’m sure anyone worth their salt could easily improve on this rudimentary design, but here’s a few pics to show the process in simple format.

The first step was marking out, then drilling the width of the average Citadel container.  I then made a rough cut with the bandsaw to make it round, before sanding to get a more rounded shape.  I have no problem admiting that it is not perfectly round, but close enough that a man on a galloping horse couldn’t see the difference.

The base I’ve shaped differently, as I intend to make a small area to hold a waterpot, brush stand and maybe a tissue/paper towel holder on one end.  That will have to wait til later, as I was getting impatient to post something this week, and really this has been the sum of my week’s effort on the hobby.  The method for turning the lazy susan was not my inspiration.  I got this from YouTube, and I wish I could remember the DIY Gamer/Painter to give him credit – it is a small channel cut into the base with the ring bearing from a microwave set into the groove.  Another channel is dug into the base of the first shelf and it turns perfectly.

The struts/supports for the unit I just made at rough height so that my hand could reach to the back paints, and set them in varying directions to better hold the weight and integrity of the overall unit.

And here is the finished product – not pretty, but perfect function over form – suits me to the ground, but I know that it can be made better.  I’ve included enough holding for about 150 pots, but really I can’t see ever getting that many paints at once, so hopefully it is future-proofed for a little bit!

I also had my second game of Warhammer this week-different opponent/teacher and very different army (it was my ramshackle Orcs and Gobbos vs. Ogres).  I was taught a lesson in more ways than one.

As a beginner, I fully expected an easy intro, kind of like the first game; but this was a true baptism by fire!  We had agreed to focus on the magic phase of this game before play, as it was a part I had difficulty in realising in the first one.  I had therefore loaded up on the shiny stuff and had a Gobin Great Shaman on Spidershrine, two level 2 Goblin Shamen, and a savage Orc Shaman to boot.  I was well prepared with potential for spells and pooling, but man oh man did the dice treat me poor for these phases!  Such raw potential reduced to pewtering and spluttering misfire!

I won’t break down a battle report proper here – I don’t think anyone is really interested at any rate, but as my second ever tutorial effort, I had a really good time, and it was a fun loss. In fact, we were pushed for time so we never really finished the game, but I saw which way the wind was blowing, and Ogres are tough hombres.  It took too much concentrated reserves to take out his wonderful Thundertusk model, which inevitably allowed his Bulls to charge my Black Orcs, and his Mournfang Cav to engage with my Boyz.  I was getting pulverised with head-on tactics, so learned very quickly to set up a charge-chain to draw them into a position with some waek Goblin units that I could flank them with my boarboyz and warboss on boar.  This made a serious dent, but the dust was just about to settle on my other poor decisions about the board.  A good teacher and a stern lesson was had here.

What I learned from this game: Wolf Riders are not that great, spiders remain awesome when they’re the charging party, Ogres cannot be allowed to charge EVER, and magic cannot be banked upon, no matter how great the odds are raised.  I need to come up with some sort of masterplan for my army – namely a good list with what I have, or what I might need to get.  Anyhelp with this would be very welcome!  I had a chance to play with a loan of a Mangler Squig which was great fun, if unpredictable.  It ruined my opponent’s cannon before it could fire, and decimated the bulls on the random way back into play-that might be a future purchase, when I can reach on it.  Overall, I was a happy loser, but now need to put some serious ink to paper to find an answer to ogres, if not all armies!

Painting this week…Wurrzag and Rock Lobber

So, as promised, although a day late in the posting – My pics of the new Finecase Rock Lobber and my Wurrzag WIP!

The Lobber was pretty easy, but as I’ve mentioned in a previous blog, it was the Finecast that was both a strength and a weakness.  The plastic needed major cleaning, especially the thinner pieces and character models.  Also, the model was warped out of packet, and needed the 15 seconds of High-Power hairdryer to manipulate into shape again.  The benefit was this entire piece has incredible detail that more than compensates when the other issues can be fixed.  I am  not deterred from purchasing Finecast into the future, but this is not a green light for GW to rack up the prices unfairly!

Rather than go through the colour choices, I’ll say this much for the lobber.  As a model, it is really nice, but as a unit in strategic gameplay,I’ve used it once and have not been over-awed.  I think I may need to invest in either a Doom Diver or a Snotling Pump Wagon (Advice welcomed!) down the road for a competitive replacement.

Wurrzag is a great model.  This is metal, and I layered the bejeebus out of it to the point that I was afraid I’d lose some detail, but am pretty happy with this work in progress overall.

As you might see, I’ve started to apply the base for some tattoos, and there is a bit left to do with stitching and rope pieces, along with a touch up on the weapon and staff, but this was a fun model to paint, and I’m now going to start looking for Wurrzag on Boar, because he will be just the tonic after painting a few Savage Orcs and Boyz!  A little treat at the end of the tunnel!  As for the next project-have a BSB to assemble and dress up, and have been making a new lazy susan for the new paint range.  My old paints occupy every available nook and an unsued toolbox, but this should solve the storage problem before it grows bigger!  I’ll post later on progress!

Take it easy all!

Shane

My very first game of Warhammer (with Battle Report)

 

So my very first Warhammer game proper…well, a tutorial game in GW Dublin at any rate.  My opponent was mercifully kind and a great teacher of the game – and, well I loved it!

I know it was a cheap victory, and not really a legal game, as I was pushing for to try out all types of units – Giant, Rock Lobber etc., and had more Special than Core units on the table, but my Orcs and Goblin force destroyed his Empire pretty easily.  He wasn’t playing very tactically except as his units dwindled, and it wouldn’t be fair to post a formal battle report for move by move, and I’ll leave my esteemed opponent unnamed as I didn’t ask him for permission to use his in this blog – but I’ll try to do some justice to the event proper.

My opponent fielded his Empire in a horde of Halberdiers, 5 Mounted Pistoliers, a Great Cannon, a unit of Greatswords and a unit of Archers.  I threw together an overkill of 20 Black Orcs, 14 Boyz, 20 Goblins, Lobber, Giant and two units of Spider Riders at 4 per unit.  We both had a bog-standard general and a level 2 wizard.  Please don’t do the math!  The table had just two pieces of terrain – a noxious forest and a hill.

After deploying, he took the first move and pushed his cav to the east flank and sent his horde dead centre.  I pushed a unit of spider riders to each flank and sent the black orcs hurtling at the halberdiers.  The Lobber took the highground and the goblins stayed in the rear with the shaman.  I attached the black orc general to the boyz and sent them to meet the Cav.  In the west, the greatswords and archers went to meet the giant and my other unit of spider riders.  Shots wise, he took out some of my black orcs with his cannon, but all archers missed.  His magic reduced the speed of the giant on my turn, but those western spiders made it into the forest and I sat them still.  In the mean time, both the eastern boyz and spider riders successfully charged the mounted pistoliers.  The Black Orcs made more headway towards the halberdiers, but no charging was attempted.  The Golbins stayed right behind the giant as he hobbled towards the greatswords and halberdiers.  I wanted to get him in sooner, but my opponents attention needed something, and those Black Orcs were the distraction.  My magic saw the foot of Gork connect and squish some halberdiers – the biggest unit as target was just as well.  I connected with Foot of Gork three times in the game, doing untold damage, but always well-missing the intended target!  Shooting the lobber was successful, but the result was a miss.  The combat resulted in my spider riders in the woods taking only a few archers out, but in the east the combined charge of the boyz and spider poison resulted in completely destroying four of the five pistoliers, and catching the final one in pursuit of him fleeing.

Skipping through the highlights of the remaining two turns – I discovered the need to get Orcs into the fray asap, as his cannon was obnoxiously good, and the first loss of cavalry made him more competitive as a player and teacher – he really took me to school with his shooting on my boyz mob.  My giant was peppered with shots down to a single wound that made me think about what a liability this guy can potentially be!  My own comeback was the awesomeness of the spider riders bows and poison to route his archers and dent the great swords from the flank – too busy with the black orcs to match the cav speeding down the side of the board.

The foot of Gork hit the halberdiers enough to thin some ranks out, and when it became even numbers with my remaining black orcs, it was downhill for him from there.  What I was very impressed with was his use of the greatswords to rip through the giant, goblins and still take out the remaining spiders on that flank before the numbers game beat them.  Great manouvering and tactics on his part to keep the game moving and forcing my decision to either head west, or take out the cannon.  I decided to take the blasted cannon, as it was hitting everything it wanted to and panicing my riders no end, after a rally, my remaining spider riders unit took them while the boyz charged the flank of halberdiers.  My Rock Lobber wasn’ in the game at all, and the Giant only got one turn on the halberdiers to take out a grand total of one on attack and one on Thunderstomp before biting the dust on two black orcs.  At the end of turn three, my opponent called it as lost, and we shook hands on a great training game.

 

What I took from this game: Very simply, he let me win and I threw some very lucky rolls to avoid animosity and hit Gork as often and successfully as I did.  Orcs have to join the battle as fast as possible, and tactics are set in motion early and committed to sooner, as Orcs are tough to change on the fly.  The worst rolls I had was in attempting to adjust.  I also learned that I love my spider riders much more than I thought I would, but need the beef to draw attention from them in order to make them effective.  I really, really like this game, and I don’t mind saying that I’m surprised by that statement.  I went into the game itself with some misgiving, but loved the atmosphere, the strategy, the planning to execution of the battles and the sheer tongue in cheek attitude of my lil O&G force!  The staff in Dublin GW were absolutely fantastic.  I have just ordered the Warboss on Gigantic Spider to pick up next week and will play my second game there then too.  I met some pretty cool players there, and saw some armies that put mine to shame, and that is not simply being self-effacing.  It highlighted that this blog of painting progress really is just for me, as real painters are well beyond my ability or advise!  Units behaved as I had hoped with the exception that both rare units are limited – I was thoroughly impressed with Waaagh! magic, and that may decide what to put on my Arachnarok for the next game.

 

So that’s it!  A day late in posting, but a really, really great time – I think I may be bitten here, so hope to find some players in Ireland, specifically the south-east for a local game, as Dublin is a schlep every week.  I can see what the fuss is about, and am already trying to figure my next steps to create a decent list for a competitive game-any and all advice welcome!

Imperium Terrain

This was an impulse purchase – I am lucky to have a nearby hobby shop that is finished with GW, and as such is getting rid of a lot of their stock cheaply (It does mean that my nearest GW/Miniature shop is approx. 50 miles away now, though!) – Anyway, I’ve picked up some of their Fantasy and 40K clobber at a steal, and fully intend to showcase here later!  Unfortunately, they are older models, so there will be nothing revelatory or “I was the first ever to cover this model” stuff, in fairness, this was never what the site was about – but I thought it’d be fun to run through some of these pieces.

This was my first peice of terrain for 40K – Honoured Imperium.  I liked the statue immediately – was easy to assemble and looked well when it overshadows the smaller miniatures.  I’d imagine that as a piece of gaming terrain it is pretty useless though.

The stages for this one were simple.  I toyed around with the concept of a stone-effect statue, but decided that my Fantasy terrain was replete with Fortress-Styles and bare hills, so thought I would try to replicate something that I did with Dreadstone Blight (Will post pics later) a year ago.  The plaques and wall-art of Dreadstone Blight I picked out in a tarnished brass effect.  I have always liked the verdigris on the Skaven metals, and this was a logical inclusion to any colour scheme where bright metal was exposed to external atmosphere.  I thought this would be a nice – if predictable and speedy way to kick out this piece in jig time.

So – the stages:

  • Primed with Chaos Black.  Don’t use black as a prime coat often, but for 40K, as I start painting them, it seems more appropriate for the inkier tones than Fantasy, LOTR or Dreadfleet.
  • The Pedastal base was my go-to formula for sontework – Chardon Granite with a medium-heavy drybrush of Dheneb Stone.  Some might want to add Rotting Flesh in a mix with the Dheneb Stone (1:1ish), but I like the even coat that foundations like Dheneb Stone give cut surfaces.  If it were rocks, I’d approach it differently.
  • The basecoat was Tin Bitz and Vermin Brown mixed to about 2:1.  I hate when bases are metals, so always try to include a neater colour.
  • I added some liquid Green Stuff to the head and leg seams to reduce the obvious split, but then had a ‘good’ idea to use it sparingly to smudge up one side of the model to account for atmospheric wear.  I decided to go against making battle-damage effects to the piece, as one type of degradation would suffice.  What have I learned?  Liquid Green Stuff has limited applications, and is best suited to hairline gaps – I really had to plough on the stuff to make a difference in the cloak piece and leg seams, and even then it may not have been worth the errand.  You be the judge!

  • Wetbrushed with Shining Gold.  Heavy enough dose to cover all of the basecoat except the interior shade pieces.
  • Drybrushed sparingly with Burnished Gold.  This is a metallic that I hate more than the rest, and is only useful for putting on top of Singing Gold.  Even then, I would shake it to the last the get the correct pigment evenly dispersed as I find it really wants to settle quite fast. I used this coat on flats and top showing parts of the model mainly, and the old maxim that less is more rang true,
  • This penultimate step was the verdigris.  I used Hawk Turquoise as a cheat, really watered down.  The first time I tried this, I was mixing all kinds of dwarf bronze and scally green to get a proper copper-sulphately looking mixture, but really Hawk Turquoise will fit the bill and is far less messy!  I applied it to logical weathered areas, and again, sparingly.  The instinct is to layer it on, but isolated drybrush strokes do the job better.
  • Finally, a slight highlight to the odd sharp edge of Chainmail or something like Mythril Silver if desired finish off the piece well.

The finish has to be touched up in spots – I overdabbed the Burnished Gold over the shield, and the banner on the shield needs to be inked with a name, but as I’m new to 40K, I don’t know who it should or might be yet! Overall though, I was pleased enough with the final draft.  It was a pretty easy piece to do up quickly, but I enjoyed the extended break from the Dreadfleet!  I may yet go longer!  I fit this one in amidst models from Dark Reach boxset and it was a welcome break during that run –  I have the other two pieces of terrain that came with the Honoured Imperium to complete yet, and they will be similarly used as link-breaks.

The model colour scheme may not be everyone’s cup of joe, but I think that the effect is strikingly different from game models while being suitable for the 40k universe.  I’d be interested to know what anyone else might think or suggest otherwise!

Good for a break – Lord of the Rings revisited

I thought that my painting of the Dreadfllet series was becoming that mid-army lull where you get awfully tired and let more mistakes to pass uncorrected, or “forget” to attend that touch up you thought you needed but couldn’t be bothered to follow up on.  To give me some respite and keep me interested, I decided to put together group of figures for the War of the Ring – specifically the Riders of Rohan cavalry units.

I love the War of the Ring models, even if the figures are a small bit less detailed than the Fantasy Battle figures – I like that GW took on the series and worked to build up another universe besides their flagship duo.  I think that anyone could have produced this series, but only GW could do so in the quanity and cost they have managed, and dare I say it, more reasonably than their other product lines.  I realise only after saying this that the recent Finecast models are quite a bit more expensive, but I refer to the base army units.  They’re a joy to paint passably, and fast to the table to boot.

As I set up this blog initially as a repository for Dreadfleet as a niche interest, I don’t plan on detailing how these were painted – even the ultra-impressive bases!  They really are GW cookie-cutter with the exception of the horses at any rate, so my best advice for anyone who wanted to emulate my pretty average paint jobs to follow their guidelines too.  The bases I rarely dress up more than this as I am not a big believer in such detailing for game purposes, but maybe later I’ll revisit – even by my standards they need a better flocking.

I need to apologise for the poor lighting too, as this is on the game table in the shed, which has rather poor lighting. This probably does the models a favour, really! There will need to be a few touchups later, especially around the faces – but that is something I don’t mind because when the mood strikes, it is nice not to have to prep an entire model from scratch and enjoy the finer touches to complete.

To be very honest, it is the horses that presented the most challenge and enjoyment – I’ve painted a few of the Warriors of Rohan in the past, and as with all base units, it can be a bit repetitive.  There were two different types of model here, so had time to experiment, correct  then perfect in each case.  For “perfect”, read “improve or make slightly less gaudy mistakes”! The colour patterns I used from…well seeing real life horses as opposed to anything from suggestion or prescribed formula, so that may account for some cartoonish effort, but I’m personally quite satisfied with them.

So there it is, Riders done in a fast forward.  I’ve been working on an Ent too, so will post that in the coming week, but for the moment, I wonder if thse would pass muster?  I have wondered whether or not to gloss varnish game pieces like these.  I will need to experiment with some more LOTR pieces, but to be fair, I’m not really sure I like the shine on the finish, no matter how protected they are when finished – does Purity Seal have a similar effect?  I’d appreciate advice from anybody in the know!  Even as I type this up, I’m not sure if many people still play the LOTR Strategy Battles anymore – probably about as many as play Dreadfleet really!  Ok – take it easy all and will post again soon!

Shane

Pirate Alliance: Flaming Scimitar

Ok, so this one is even more involved than I first suspected!  It is a really nice piece – tough to assemble quickly, but worth it for the detail!  It takes less time on the more dynamic aspects, but the majority of my time was taken on the hull and of course – the feckin’ sails!  As of this post, the sails are incomplete, and I am making a promise to myself to revisit later, but felt that this post was late enough without perfecting the one element that I really am finding great difficulty with when painting this set – so here goes!

  • I painted the model entirely in all the constituent pieces.  The water base was done as usual along GW guidelines – listed on the terrain section of this site, but while doing this, don’t forget the water spirits/elementals supporting the ship’s hull too.
  • Primed all parts in Skull White.
  • The hull was Liche Purple, while the deck and Masts were based in Calthan Brown.I washed the hull with Leviathan Purple before a smaller highlight of the same Liche Purple.
  • All gold areas – and this is painter’s choice I based with Scorched Brown.  I originally tried a Skull White – especially on the Hull detail – but the difference was too stark, and close to the whiteheads in the water so I decided to go with the gold.  Once the Scorched Brown was dry, I went over it all with Shining Gold.  This is a bit more time-consuming than you might imagine too, so I advise patience, coffee and a fine detail brush!  The dome to the rear and the statue to the front of the model were both fitted with the same gold finish, but I went with Dwarf Bronze for the sword of the statue, which I think worked out quite well with the brown undercoat toning the shine down slightly.
  • The Deck was next washed in Devlan Mud, and later highlighted with a 1:1 mix of Scorched Brown and Calthan Brown.  I coated the cannon in Boltgun Metal with a Chainmail silver highlight.
  • The Air djinn I based in Astronomicon Grey before washing in avery watery Shadow Grey,  Following plenty of time to dry, I decided to follow up with a mix of Bleached Bone and Deneb Stone (1:1) again for light dry brushing.  After this I tipped the extreme highlights with Skull White.  This was a good finish, the picture below does it no justice!
  • The Fire Efreet I based in Solar Orange – but Blazing Orange would do the trick too for a more vibrant under-colour.  I followed this up with a Desert Yellow light drybrush, then a wash of Baal Red before a drybrush with some a more yellowy yellow – Sunburst was the one I went with, I think, making sure to get the tips of the dual blades too.  Again, as with the air dude, went with Skull White for the extreme highlighting, but was more sparing with the fire spirit as the bright yellow would be too toned back including the white.  My best advise when doing both the spirits was to remember to get the tower at the rear of the ship too, as the air djinn cicles the building, and the fire guy spills out from his window too.  I didn’t remember and had to do some minor backtracking, but as always, better to get it all in when going at it first – gives the rest a chance to dry between coats too.
  • The Sails in this set…anyway –  as seen in the above poorly lit pic, they are only based, but I’ll tell you how I got this far at least.  Undercoat in Bleached Bone, followed by a second layer of Bleached Bone and Desert Yellow mix – 1:1.  GW prescibed Bubonic Brown in the mix instead of the Desert Yellow, but I found this too dark.  The swords on the sails I gave a light coat of Tin Bitz and Scorched Brown mix 1:1ish should do it.  The Flames were picked out in Sunburst Yellow – if the tone is too close to the sail, then throw in some Bad Moon for the luminesence.  I touched it up with some Blazing Orange.  The water effect was just Icy Blue with  Skull White on the highlighting – the air was Astonomicon Grey with yet more Skull White extreme highlighting.  I still need to go back to the sails, and I really wanted to make a better go of the main areas with  a larger flat brush for better cover without overworking the layers – but nearly there!

Final thoughts on this model  to date – I like it for the detail, and raw character that exudes from the ship.  The masts are a tight fit to the deck, but other than that, it goes together well after painting without rubbing thre finish at all.  I put completing  this model off a few times this week as I have just started a few Lord of the Rings cavalry models as a break, and I may give the Dreadfleet to the back-burner for a little bit longer.  I feel my interest waning, and don’t want the remaining paint jobs to suffer for that.  I’ll post my LotR bits soon, and I’ve recently found a reduced to clear Assault on Black Reach – my first 40K set ever, so might just run at that too before returning to the high seas.